$1.99 book sale!

Harlequin have been publishing ebooks for ten years!  To celebrate they’re offering 10,000 ebooks at $1.99 each, including my first book Falling for Her Captor.  If you haven’t read it now is your chance to get hold of a copy.

Falling for Her Captor at $1.99

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Readers have described it as

A feisty heroine, a drop-dead gorgeous hero, a nastier-than-real-life villain, and a plot you can sink your teeth into.

A really gripping, and at times dark, story that really kept my attention.

A satisfying read, with some great ambiance and a fast-paced romance, if you’ve not read this period before, then this is a great introduction to it.

Loads of emotional tension between the two of them keep you turning the pages and the ending is both heartfelt and satisfying. Highly recommend.

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Only a Winter’s Tale?

I think A Wager for the Widow was released at the wrong time of year because I’m definitely getting a more wintery feel to the evenings now and can all too clearly imagine Eleanor and Will shivering out in the gardens and cuddling up for warmth in this scene.

Why not get hold of a copy, light the fire, pour a glass of your favourite winter drink and lose yourself on the Cornish Coast?

Buy your copy here
Buy your copy here

“The sun, which had barely broken through the heavy clouds all day, had nearly disappeared below the archway, turning the buildings grey. Eleanor shivered as the icy wind hit her. She almost went back for her cloak, but the sound of voices and laughter drifted to her from the Outer Hall. She shook her head and made her way round the side of the house to the walled garden where she hoped to find some protection from the weather, and threw herself on to a stone bench.
Eleanor pulled a sprig of rosemary and fitfully ripped the leaves off one by one, letting them drop on to the ground with a trembling hand.  She drew her knees up to her chest and hugged herself tightly to ward off the cold. She stared into the shadows and her stomach twisted again as she thought of the argument with her mother. Her eyes swam with tears that were hot in the biting wind. How long would it be before she was missed and summoned back to the house? She drew deep breaths, fighting the urge to run to her chamber, pack her belongings and return home.
‘Lady Peyton?’
The voice was low and unexpected. Eleanor gave a start. She spun round to find William Rudhale standing by the far end of the bench, a large bundle under one arm. Eleanor bowed her head quickly, unwilling for him to see the evidence of her tears, and wiped them away with the back of her hand.
‘Why are you here?’ Eleanor asked suspiciously. ‘Did my mother send you to find me?’
‘Nobody sent me,’ he answered softly. ‘You looked distressed so I decided to follow you.’
He gestured to the bench and raised an eyebrow. After a moment’s hesitation Eleanor nodded and the steward sat down beside her.
He unfurled the bundle that he carried and Eleanor recognised his voluminous red cloak.
‘I thought you might need some shelter from the wind. It is no weather to be out in without something to keep you warm.’
Eleanor’s lip trembled and she bit down on it. ‘Thank you,’ she whispered, her voice catching in her throat.
Rudhale leaned across and gently wrapped the cloak around Eleanor’s shoulders. Their eyes met and he gave a slight smile, as though being caught in the act of a kindness embarrassed him. He brushed a stray lock of hair from her cheek with fingers that left a trail of heat across her skin.
At this gesture of kindness, Eleanor’s emotions finally overwhelmed her. She put her head in her hands and burst into sobs, not caring that the steward saw or what he might think. Her frame shook with each fresh rush of tears. She was dimly aware of Rudhale’s arm slipping around her shoulders as he drew her head down on to his chest.
Eleanor stiffened momentarily as the unfamiliar closeness provoked feelings that were much more alarming than her grief. Rudhale’s hand found a home in the small of her back and she melted willingly against him. She could not say for how long she cried, conscious only of warmth, of Rudhale’s soothing wordless murmurs as she let her sadness flood out, and of the comfort of his strong arms around her body.”

Excerpt From: Elisabeth Hobbes. “A Wager for the Widow.” iBooks.

Buy A Wager for the Widow here

Vote for Sir Hugh as Harlequin Hero of the Year

vote

I’m slowly getting to grips with technology though I should confess that for a long time I thought this was Paul Hollywood from Great British Bake Off.

Clicking on the pic should take you to the contest page where you can vote for Sir Hugh.  If you want a reason why he should win check out what readers have said in their Reviews for Falling for Her Captor

Every vote is gratefully received.

A very eventful day and a new contest!

Today is the first anniversary of the publication of Falling for Her Captor.  It’s been a fabulous year since release.  The book has received some amazingly positive reviews.  I had a second book released in July, my third is with my editor and I’ve started writing the fourth.

Today was always going to be a celebration of that but it turned out there were multiple reasons.

I found out that Hugh, hero of Falling for Her Captor has made it into Harlequin’s  Hero of the Year contest.  There are sixteen heroes to choose from who will be narrowed down until only one remains.  He’s currently in Region 3 up against a straight laced District Attorney and needs your support to make it through to the next round!

Vote for Hugh here

You can vote daily so remember to go back tomorrow (and the day after…and the day after…)

Falling for her Captor is also released in French today.  If you always meant to brush up your language skills there can’t be a better way than trying to get your tongue round this.  It’s available on Amazon.

Book things aside, the most important thing that happens today is that my son is 10.  Ten.  Double figures.  Closer to adulthood than birth.  This makes me feel all kinds of strange (and old).  He’s currently doing musical things I don’t understand with electronics that alarm me for the number of dials and jacks.  I miss the days of Duplo but he’s turning into such a lovely, grown up boy and I love him loads.

Shameless self-promo

Harlequin are running a contest to find the Harlequin Hero of the year.  The hero has to appear in a book published between October 2014 and September 2015 which means both Hugh and Will are eligible.  The top sixteen heroes will face off to find hero of the year (and who wouldn’t want to watch those scenes acted out) and it would be lovely to see a Historical hero in the mix.  If you’ve enjoyed my books and think Hugh or Will have what it takes please nominate them.

You can Vote here by leaving a comment or tweet to Harlequin Books using the hashtag #HarlequinHero including the name of the hero, book and author.

Nominations end on September 20th.

I’ve never heard one called that before!

Warning- links in this post contain language that may offend.
Since starting writing I’ve searched for all manner of things I never expected to.  If my internet use is being monitored I’m sure the powers that be are building up a rather odd picture of my interests.  The other week I was searching for methods of hanging in Norman England (trapdoor opening or just push the condemned ladder?  Most likely the latter which was good as it gave me the opportunity for a dramatic end to a couple of characters).  I was also searching for terms to describe certain body parts and came across these wonderful and extremely helpful timelines of terms used for male and female genitalia recorded back as far as the 1200s.  Some of them are wonderfully descriptive, others I found hard to work out the origin, quite a few would make wonderful character names in themselves.

I was prompted to write this post after a conversation with a friend regarding the fun game of rearranging spice jars in the supermarket to spell out rude words and began wondering whether it would be more fun to use old terms.  For anyone wishing to extend their repertoire of herb based humour follow the links below (which as far as I know is an un-used term).

For the ladies

For the gentlemen

Voila! Cover Reveal

Falling for Her Captor is being published in French in October and I can now reveal the cover.
Dans Les Bras De L'Ennemi

I love the close up as it shows the lovely details of the model’s clothes, and of course those earrings that I still covet.

The link to buy  from Amazon.fr is here Dans Les Bras de L’Ennemi for anyone wanting to brush up their French! Très bon!

A month down the line

A Wager for the Widow has been out for a month.  Yesterday I had a wonderful review on Cataromance which described the book as ‘a fantastic historical romance that sweeps readers back to the past and enchants them with its intoxicating blend of intrigue, adventure, passion and pathos.’

I’ve had an amazing response for the book and I’d like to thank everyone who has taken the time to read and review or share news about the book or comment on my Facebook page or Twitter feed.  If you haven’t already, come over and say hello. As always its talking to readers and finding out what you think about my writing that keeps me going.  Every comment means a lot to me.

I know there have been issues with availability in America thanks to Amazon gremlins but these are sorted now so if you haven’t been able to get hold of your copy now you can Buy it here on Amazon.com

I’m going to be taking a break from the internet as I’m embarking on a road trip around France and Spain, taking in the Picos de Europa which I’ve always wanted to visit.  I’ll still be hard at work editing my work in progress and starting to plan my fourth book.  Maybe I’ll even find a handsome Spaniard to inspire me!

A Wager for the Widow – Elisabeth Hobbes

Bookish Jottings

piccie
A compelling, poignant and highly engrossing Medieval romance from an outstanding new author of historical romance, A Wager for the Widow is the second mesmerizing novel by fast-rising star Elisabeth Hobbes.

The widowed Lady Peyton cherishes her life of independence where she is the mistress of her own destiny and nobody’s subordinate – unlike many other women of her time. Eleanor’s life on her secluded island might get lonely at times, but she wouldn’t have it any other way. She loves pleasing herself and not having anyone to answer to and she is not exactly overjoyed when she is summoned by her father, Lord Edgar, to the family home over midwinter. Well aware that her parents are keen to see her married off again, preferably to a man of great rank and fortune, Eleanor is not looking forward to being paraded around like a prized heifer by her mother and…

View original post 528 more words

Cover Comparison

Falling for Her CaptorA Wager for the Widow

I’ve got two covers now and I don’t know whether or not it was intentional on the part of the art department but they’re very similar.  Both feature lovely heroines in green with moody skies in the background.  As much as I would have loved to see who they chose to play the heroes (one dark, one blonde – who would you choose?) I really like my ladies.

Which cover do you prefer?  Do you go for the covers with couples or heroes rather than heroines?  Let me know in the comments or over on Twitter @elisabethhobbes or Facebook ElisabethHobbesAuthor

I’ve used one of the American Harlequin branded ones and a UK Mills & Boon as the logos are different but both books are available on Amazon.com and co.uk and other online sites. Clicking on the cover pictures should take you right there if the cover has whetted your appetite.

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